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and caution the u.s. is investigating claims that the syrian president bashar assad used them, the president bristleed when israeli reporter suggested the u.s. has been sitting on their hands. >> it's incorrect for you to say we have done nothing. we helped mobilize the isolation of the assad regime internationally. we have supported and recognized the opposition. >> the president first said assad's days were numbers 19 months ago. last summer, he warned of potential u.s. force against syria. >> red line for us. we start saying bunch of chemical weapons moving around or utilized. that would change my calculus. >> back in washington today, the top republican charged the administration's policy has been adrift. >> the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in their words. it backed the u.n. diplomacy and bet on moscow to play a productive role. none of this worked. >> netanyahu's intelligence director said it's clear that the chemical weapons were used in syria. the chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes that chemical weapons were used by the regime as a caveat. >>
where there are reports that president assad, although still unconfirmed and his people are saying, no, no, it was the rebels. it looks more likely to have been assad's forces used chemical weapons, killing 16 people, wounding scores more. how significant is this, do you think? >> reporter: well, first of all, it needs to be substantiated if the chemical weapons were, in fact, used. there is conflicting information. the regime is accusing the rebels of firing the weapons. the rebels say that's impossible, we do not have that kind of weaponry at our disposal. but military analysts do believe syria as one of the largest stock piles of chemical weapons inhe world and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers, saying there is a high probability that the assad regime has used chemical weaponry but they are awaiting final verification. bearing in mind there have been allegations in the past that chemical weapons were used in syria and holmes for example late last year. those allegations were never substantiated. the white house has been saying something of a red line, a g
, as this crisis in syria reaches what could be a tipping point where there are reports that president assad, although still unconfirmed and his people are saying, no, no, it was the rebels, but it looks more likely to be assad's forces, have used chemical weapons killing 16 people, wounding scores more. how significant is this, do you think? >> reporter: well, first of all, it needs to be substantiated if those chemical weapons were in fact used. there has been, as you mentioned, conflicting information over at the regime that's accusing the rebels of firing these weapons, and the rebels are saying that's absolutely impossible. we do not even have that kind of weapon which at our disposal, but military analysts do believe that syria has won of the largest stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world, and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers, saying that there is a high probability that the assad regime has, in fact, used chemical weaponry although they are waiting final verificatiove. bearing in mind, too, there's been allegations in the past that chemical weapons we
in syria that brought a signal warning from the president to president assad's discredited regime. >> we have been clear that the use of chemical weapons against the syrian people would be a serious and tragic mistake. the assad regime must understand that they will be held accountable for the use of chemical weapons or their transfer to terrorists. >> and the president said his administration is fully investigating those claims of chemical weapons used in syria. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engle join us. the first question out of the gate was a robust one, asking the president about the slaughter of innocence in syria and the alleged use of chemical weapons there. the president said pointedly that use of chemical weapons would be a game changer and that assad and his regime would be held accountable. but this is an incredibly tough case for the president, isn't it? >> reporter: i don't think the president wants to get involved in syria. i think the bar is very high. i think the president worries that if he starts getting involved in syria and becomes known as protector
bashar assad eventually leaves there is a risk extremists will take over. >> they thrive in failed states. they thrive in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to actually building things but they are very good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functioning. >> shepard: and no matter how this unfolds, the president says the outcome in syria is not going to be ideal our chief white house correspondent traveling with live in amman jordan. the president is getting more pressure to use military in syria. >> he he is the president wept out and vowed that he would rid asyria of all the extremist still left there a sign that he is ready to kill more people. is he digging in even deeper president obama is getting pressure no-fly zone. come up with surgical air strikes. something to stop the killing. but the president today said at a news conference you have to be very careful with u.s. power. >> what your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily. and, you know, i think it's fair to say that the united states often finds its
further and said that if assad crosses it there will be, quote, consequences. he has said you will be held accountable. today his chief of staff said on cnn that it would be a game changer if, in fact, chemical weapons were used. now the president has not specified what he means exactly when he says assad or his regime would be held accountable. there have been reports that the u.s. has developed a plan for direct action against syria, but there's no indication the president is pursuant. let's be realistic. it's hard to imagine that the u.s. would take any direction action to syria when the president is visiting the neighborhood here in israel in less than 24 hours, anderson. >> marine one has just landed at andrews air force base. there you see it happening. again, the president will surely be getting on air force one heading toward israel. jessica, the president as you said is in the region. it does add pressure to the president's trip, particularly in israel if, in fact, chemical weapons have been used in neighboring syria. >> reporter: absolutely. syria was always going to be a part of
to directly get rid of the assad regime and i think the additional line is that we're going to go really hard back at moscow. because moscow's assistance has been pivotal in keeping assad in office. >> how do we go hard back at moscow? >> first of all, go at them diplomatically. their interests where the united states and russia have certain parallel interests and work those interests. the russians believe in linkage. everything with the russians is about linkage. what does putin get from continuing to support assad? one thing he might get a higher oil prices because there's a risk premium on oil. this is important for russia. >> absolutely. >> you know, the united states is going to be a big factor in russia's future because we increase the oil production and the predictions are predicting more than russia or saudi arabia in five or six years. that's a mortal threat to russia if it affects the price of oil. >> all right. and seth, what damage could be done with these chemical weapons? you know, if we're hearing and this rhetoric out of dianne feinstein, mike rogers is different. this is -- t
's thinking on what to do about syria, how the united states can help move to the post-assad period. >> let me ask you quickly about this speech, because it's coming up in about 40 minutes. obviously, the relationship, if you look at the polls between the president and the israeli people, has been strained as well. here's what a university professor wrote in "the daily beast" this morning. mr. obama will be talking to young people who are neither listless cynics nor disaffected sofa-plit koes. many of them have marched in demonstrations and took active part in protest rallies. our record of effective activism is by comparison to every other recent social movement, stellar. is this an important speech for him there? if so, what should his message be? >> well, it is an important speech. he has about a 10% approval rating in israel. that will undoubtedly tick up. but this is part of the president's style. you remember in 2009 he spoke at cairo university. he's made a choice here. he's not going to speak government to government. he's going to move beyond that dialogue to talk directly to the isra
are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. i'm confident that assad will go. it is not a question of if. it is when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what is the aftermath? for the american people we have to recognize we have a stake here. >> a half million syrian refugees have fled to jordan. a nation already dependent on foreign aid including $13 billion from the u.s. king abdullah says assad's days are numbers but fears islam rule could emerge in its place. chuck todd is traveling with the president and asking the president as many questions as he wants. that's how chuck todd gets down. chuck, i have one question for you. what is going on in your world right now? >> well, it has been a pretty busy day. you brought up the issue of syria and this is classic all politics is local issue when it comes to jordan. this issue of syrian refugees and the economic toll it is taking on the country is clearly the number one item on the king's agenda. he equated it. he made an interesting little parallel. he said they may get
administration to use patriot missiles to degrade the assad regime's air power and the chair and ranking members of the house intelligence committee have introduced a bill calling for the administration to arm syrian rebels. asked today about whether the united states would provide a more aggressive military response to the syrian crisis, the president would only say this. >> the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily then it's criticized for going in militarily. and if it doesn't go in militarily then people say why aren't you doing something militarily, and, you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contributes to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. >> joining me now is nbc's peteral exandriny. >> the president wraps up his four-day visit to the middle east tomorrow. with renewed pressure to handle the crisis in syria, a nation he's not visiting, what is the effect of this trip been on that issue, do you think? >> reporter: well, i think we've got a pretty good sense of it as i was there in the news conferen
weapon attack in syria. the rebels are blaming president assad's forces, but the government blames the rebels. meanwhile, president obama has said use of chemical weapons would be a red line for his administration. but if these latest accusations prove true, is now the time for u.s. boots on the ground? here now to tell us is house intelligence committee chair mike rogers. he's a republican from michigan. keith and jimmy are still with us. chairman rogers, thank you very much, sir. is there truly conclusive evidence that one side or the other has really used chemical weapons. >> larry, when i look at all of the evidence, all of the intelligence, and the body of reporting over the last two years, i come to the conclusion with a high probability that the assad regime has used, at least in limited quantities, chemical weapons. they've also put them in a position to be used, and i believe, and the intelligence community, i think, believes that they have serious intent to use them under the right circumstances. so the red line that the president talked about, august 20th, was, if they m
.s. is training fighters to join the battle against president bashar assad owho has been slaughtering his own people for more than two years now. the program has been going on in jordan for at least 8 months. the trainees do not include members of free syrian army which has meanwhile the u.s. reports it's pulling half of its foreign staffers out of syria after a mortar attack damaged their hotel and a vehicle in damascus. a spokesman says that the move is temporary and united nations is still committed to finding a political solution to that bloody civil war. the united nations now we are hearing about new fox report correspondent more sign today of how tough this remains for that opposition. >> on a military and political level, first the e founder and one the leaders of the free syrian army has been badly wounded in a car bomb attack. in fact, we are hearing that that gentleman right there has lost a leg. that a major blow to the free syria army. then on the political front, the leader of the syrian national coalition has resigned. citing differences with other senior figures within the opp
. >>> and now syria. the assad regime and rebel forces are accusing one another of using chemical weapons. syrian state media reported that rebel forces launched a chemical attack killing at least two dozen people, injuring more than 100 people. rebels deny that charge vehemently and accuse regime forces of shelling a town near damascus with chemical rockets. our senior international reporter is in amman, jordan, this morning. i know there are a lot of questions to substantiating the claims. what do we know so far? >> reporter: most of the information is coming from syrian state tv. and that's claiming that at least 25 people were killed in some kind of an attack in a village. scores of people wounded. and then syrian state tv playing interviews with some of the alleged victims who were saying that they smelled chlorine and almost all aping the same message, is this the freedom that the free syrian army rebels want? so some of those statements do come out to be a little suspect. neither side has been entirely truthful when it comes to the information and media war over syria. now very qui
going on between the assad regime and rebels, all this talk in the past 48 hours about possible chemical weapons being used. this is very close to where the president is going to be. and then if you go beyond this, and you move over here to iran, look, here is israel over here, here is syria, here is iraq. here is iran over here. iran is about the size of alaska. you may notice at this point, it is all out here, sort of receiptireceipt i reddish looking. they may be a year away from having a nuclear weapon. the reason this is red is this is the range of the shehadeh 3 missile from iran. it easily reaches over here to israel and that's important to bear in mind, because all this is happening in the small place. here is a simple way to describe it. if you went from tehran directly over to tel aviv, this is the distance from boston to chicago. you cross only four or five states in the united states to cover all that ground and all of these issues, wolf, are happening in this really relatively small area and as we pointed out, right in the middle, here is iraq, some of the turmoil that happe
. >> the violence is not going to stop unless and until assad understands that he can't shoot his way out of, this that the better course of action, if he wants to save his country is to allow a transition to better government. >> this new amateur video out of syria while impossible to authenticate shows the fighting apparently raging in key centers including homes in damascus. as a leader of the main syrian rebel group is throwing his support behind the formation of an interim government whose leader may be tomorrow in istanbul, turkey, shep. >> shepard: nations have long avoided during this conflict the idea of sending weapons directly to the rebels. that's changed or no? >> it seems to have changed. at a news conference with the australian foreign minister a short time ago. secretary of state john kerry really opened the door stating the u.s. does not stand in the way of other countries, whether it's france or britain or anyone else who wants to it arm the opposition. >> so as long as the president assad continues to attack his own people with scuds, with aircraft, with tanks, there is an
about whether a cornered al assad might hit jerusalem or israel. it was dramatic and it made me wonder if we missed something. i wonder what you're sense of where we are on this matter today is. >> reporter: well, it still is confusing. there are reports all over the map. prime minister netanyahu's intelligence minister today telling army radio that there are suggestions to him that chemical weapons in fact were used by the syrian government. but there was a hearing on capitol hill where in fact there were lawmakers kicking it around and the u.s. embassador to syria said we don't know this as a fact yet. it needs to be investigated. the embassador echoed what president obama said. another key republican, mike rogers, the house intelligence chairman, was on cbs news this morning and said he thinks, it appears to him, chemical weapons were used but he's a former fbi official who wants to see forensic evidence. that's important for a republican lawmaker to underline saying we need evidence before we say chemical weapons were used. >> ed henry on a historic day in jerusalem. we look forwar
concerned that assad president -- president assad cornered desperate, may turn to these sort of chemical weapons. now, if and as you heard there, it is a big if, if any chemical weapon was used today, unlikely that was sara ran or mustard gas. schedule one chemicals according to the chemical weapons geneva convention. more likely according to some witnesses it was chlorine there was according to at least one witness a smell of chlorine in the air. that is only a schedule 3 chemical weapon. that could provide wiggle room for any western governments talking about red lines here, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt in our newsroom in new york. well, a moment for the history books on an a spectacular day in rome. and he sure looked like the people's pope. the new pontiff, pope francis got an upclose and personal with followers young and old as thousands turned up for the inauguration of pope francis. plus, winter is coming to a nasty end. another one-two punch of snow and rain hammering the east. what to expect now ahead from the journalists of fox news on this tuesday fox report. congratulation
anything else in syria. >> in syria, you think it's time? >> the day after assad leaves, the biggest fear is where do the chemical weapons go? remember what happened in libya? all of these weapons are in the middle east. when assad falls we need an international coalition and we'll be part of it to secure the ten or 12 weapons sites that have the weapons. if we don't control those chemical weapons we'll be in real trouble down the road. >> the countries, many have war fatigue. >> yes. >> when you raise the thoughts of boots on the ground in syria, most people chills go up their spine. >> i totally get it. here is what i hope we're not tired of, defending ourselves against weapons of mass destruction. and the question for the american people at large, who gets the weapons when assad falls, radical islamists or control them so we make sure they're not in the bad guy's in general. i'm sorry the war is going on so long and the i want the people at large to say we're war weary, but trust me if we let the weapons get into the iran or islamist hands. it has to be a footprints-- >> and what about
for the cia, and former cia officer bob baer. this video we just showed from the assad regime, shown on syrian state television. want to show it again. it's supposedly a victim suffering from a chemical weapons attack. no one shows any physical signs of injury, no convulsions, no vomiting. at least three experts on chemical weapons say that judging from what they see here, it doesn't seem like a chemical weapons attack. knowing what you know about these type of agents and their effect on humans, do you agree? >> you know, it's difficult to tell without examining the patients. and you need sophisticated equipment to do that. a lot of the symptoms you're seeing in these patients could be caused by insecticide, for instance. any organophosphate which sarin is, but the fact that so few people have died or if any have died tells me that this probably wasn't a sarin attack but we can't rule out some sort of diluted chemical had been used. >> the regime is saying it's the rebels using chemicals. if it was something like a diluted chemical, dispersal agent or something, would that be crossing the red
before assad goes. jessica yellin is live from amman, jordan where that press conference just wrapped. jessica, the president said assad would go but sounded perhaps a little annoyed about being asked how that might happen. why was he seemingly annoyed? >> well, jake, we counted and this is the sixth time that the president or a member of his administration has said assad must go just in the last month alone. but none of them has laid out a plan or a path for direct action by the united states to help remove assad from power. without any direct military intervention by the u.s. the president knows he is vulnerable to criticism. that he is standing by while a massacre is taking place and that is a particularly sharp and poignant charge when he is standing here in jordan where they are providing refuge to some 7,000 syrians who are fleeing for safety every day. some 7,000 people crossing the border into jordan from syria each day because of the violence there. >> i believe the king abdullah of jordan said that the settlements of refugees now form something like the fifth largest town in
the ancient city of petra. ramp up criticism of syrian president bashar assad. >> ed henry is live this morning in amman jordan with the very latest. good morning, ed. >> good toe sue i goose, interesting. because as you know you have got syria on jordan's northern border. and there are hundreds of thousands of refugees spilled out because of that ongoing civil war. all that strife. the violence, president assad killing his own people. they are winding up here in jordan. many of them and there is a lot of pressure building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say th
join the effort of others to arm the opposition? how long will assad stay in power? that changes on almost a day-to-day basis because the situation is so uncertain as it enters the third year. the president is a bit defensive because people ask where was the world's biggest super power? you are supposed to be the voice of humanitarian needs around the world. how could you let this go on so long? why haven't you done more? the president said today at the news conference the united states from the start was calling on assad to step down and we know if you look at the calendar it is simply not true. many other countries were ahead of the united states in calling for assad to step down but it's a tough one for the president. he is right in the sense the united states used military force in this region from the beginning, there is still a big hangover from the iraq war in this part of the world. it would have been controversial. all the choices are difficult. he does get a bit defensive when that question is posed, wolf. >> he certainly does at least that is the impression you get fro
the chemical weapons and if they did, that would suggest the assad stockpile has fallen into their hands. the regime is saying the rebels did have it, but the assad regime are the ones with the large chemical stockpile. once again no definitive proof they were used at all, but a serious development. >> one that the president had spoken about hypothetically back in august when he used the words red line. here he was in august. >> we have been very clear to the assad regime, but also to other players on the ground that a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized. that would change my calculus. >> so if the reports are true and i know you're careful not to say that we -- we don't know at this point in time. if they are, how might the international community act in response? >> reporter: it's very unlikely you would see u.s. or western military boots on the ground. what we have seen a move towards in the last few months is suggestion of arming the rebels. john kerry saying just yesterday he wouldn't say in the way if the uk and franc
's a long standing syria through the decline or democrat myself of the assad regime, which i think is inevitable, will be a serious blow to iran. >> so if you have washington, sir, on one side of the scale and tehran on the other, who does baghdad more closely align with? >> well, our hope is, of course, that it will be a truly democratic regime which will be primarily loyal to the interests of the people in iraq and that their views will be consistent with others in supporting and strengthening democratic institutions. but as with many of the other countries in the middle east, there are a whole series of conflicting interests there and it will play out over a long period of time. but our interest is in democratic institutions, democratic societies who will serve their people and not be so much interested in the kinds of conflicts that have raged for so long in that region. >> you mentioned your hopes are for the inevitable assad regime there in syria. but today one of the national coalition, the head of that resigned. he was the key u.s. ally among the rebels. how big of a blow i
, maybe chlorine gas, that's not nerve agents. i think that assad may have been testing the waters. if chemicals were used, you've got to watch if he's going to use them in the future as the situation grows increaselying desperate and feels he has nothing to do lose, but meanwhile for us and for the israelis, apart from the geopolitical mess and instability, the real and present danger is chemical weapons falling into the hands of islamist fanatics. we are apparently, i'm told, we're told, we're working on a plan to deal with that militarily if necessary, but if we have to, megyn, it's going to be ugly and tough and messy. >> megyn: and i wanted just to clarify so it was the israeli minister of intelligence and strategic affairs who says it's apparently clear that a chemical weapons were used in syria and that that alleged attack will be a main topic of conversation between those two leaders today. ralph stand by, i'd love to hear from you on the opposite side of this presser to get some context on what we're about to hear. if the israelis are saying that syria has crossed the red
press has said they use cyprus banks to fund the assad regime. the other thing i wanted to mention, larry, since the beginning of the year, putin has wanted to reduce the exposure of russian oil garbages abroad and actually started since february to use cyprus a little bit, yes. i think -- less. they prefer the leathnetherland prove some of their money. and putin has wanted to exempt cyprus from some of this -- to protect cyprus as a haven, even as some of his cronies are moving their money further west, anticipating some kind of disaster, just as has happened, in fact. so they're not entirely taken by surprise. >> no. i don't think anybody is. i mean, i think everybody knew this was going to happen. and it's happening. >> but, larry, the bottom line is, the risk of allowing a run on the cypriot banks is so significant, that it's worth it to let russia come in. >> i agree. >> and put $5 billion down. and basically stabilize the situation, rather than have it be done some other way, which would involve the euro. >> i don't see how they can avoid a run oppose on the banks, one way or
, consorting with iran and rearming assad undercuts all of the international efforts to get assad out of there. so by propping up assad in a hot war, if you will, in a civil war where 70,000-plus people have already died, al maliki has become more of a problem than a solution. >> andrea mitchell as always, going to where the news is. thank you for the perspective from the room. much appreciated. >> christopher hill is the former u.s. ambassador to iraq and the dean of the corbell school of international studies at denver university and joins us to talk more about the situation. now ambassador hill, i want to to talk about andrea used the phrase "an erratic figure" to describe president karzai, particularly after his comments of the alleged u.s. collusion with the taliban that he is now saying was a misunderstanding. can we trust karzai after the behavior he has exhibited over the last three and a half weeks? >> i think we know karzai pretty well we've dealt with him for a long time. and i think secretary kerry in particular has a kind of personal relationship with him. i think with respect to
who called for active approach to take out president bashar assad, from no-fly zone to airstrike. >> it's tragic. it's heart-breaking. the sight of children and women being slaughtered that we have seen so much i think has to compel all of us to say what more can we do? >> king abdullah is also under pressure. since a refugee camp alone is now the fifth largest city in jordan. there is also fear extremists will spread chemical weapons from syria to jordan and israel. abdullah resisted any foreign military intervention and today visibly winced as a reporter asked if it would provide asylum. the president tid penal is $200 million more in u.s. taxpayer assistance to jordan for refugee and scored diplomatic victory by getting israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to patch things up by phone with his turkish counterpart after a bitter spat that could have hendered u.s. efforts to get turkey's help on syria. the president visited the church of the nativity in bethlehem and continued outreach to the people. although a stop at the holocaust museum in jerusalem may have provided a ch
it a significant esklation of the assad regime. >> the carnage grows. the port is building in the west to give weapons to syrian rebels. cnn's nick peyton walsh is joining us from beirut. let's start with the rockets fired into lebanon. how close to the capitol did they come? >> reporter: it was still pretty far out in the border region between lebanon and syria. very mountainous, indistinct where the border is. we understand two war planes hit derelict buildings, but governments tried to keep out of the fighting with a policy that calls disassociation. the concern is not that this will get a government or military response back to syria, but it might ignite the sectarian tensions inside lebanon, which pretty much mirror those that play in syria. also point out, wolf, rebels unleashing a barrage of rockets in central damascus, too. a real uptick in violence today, wolf. >> when it comes to arming the rebels, looks like there's a change emerging from the united states. what's going on? >> reporter: well, john kerry came out today and said quite clearly that he would not stand in the way of alli
are saying that the more desperate bashar al assad becomes, the more dangerous he also becomes. >> we've been very clear about our concerns that the assad regime is increasingly beleaguered, that it finds that the violence that it is using by conventional means is inadequate, including its barbaric use of scuds so we are quite concerned that they will resort to other weapons. we've made clear that this would constitute a red line for the united states. the president could not have been clearer about it. >> there are no plans right now to put any boots on the ground. but last year, the pentagon did do a report analyzing what it would take to secure those chemical weapons. they concluded it may take up to 70,000 troops on the ground. >> all right, chris lawrence at the pentagon, thanks. in just a few minutes we're going to talk to israeli government spokesman mark regev about the latest in syria and the president's trip to israel. >>> a disturbing story from colorado. zoraida sambolin has that. >> this just in to cnn the executive director of colorado's corrections department shot and killed la
spirited discussion on the subject of the over flights. anything that supports president assad is problematic and i made it very clear to the prime minister that the over flights in iran are, in fact, helping to sustain president assad and his regi regime. >> customer reported he left the meeting without reaching an agreement with maliki. those oppose to assad's government is trying to maintain a coalition after the backed opposition resigned. with the help of the cia, arab nations in turkey have sharply stepped up aid to the rebels. there is a troublesome straight line from afghanistan, where the secretary of state is this morning, through iran, through iraq, and into syria. >> i think the people who also have noticed this are the afghan leadersh leadership. so it's interesting. you have secretary hagel who does a visit. secretary kerry now doing the visit. the president hasn't been to afghanistan in a year now and other things taking his attention in the region whether iran and rising tensions with syria and economic challenges in jordan, et cetera. they are watching this stu
at this point. malaki's focus is not having a regime in syria. our focus is not allowing assad to continue to exist. >> that's right. the shia regime doesn't want to see a sunni regime in syria. iran wants to maintain assad's power and iran is shipping weapons through iraq to syria. many people say it's those weapons and a lot of the training coming from iran that is propping up the aassad regime in syria. if we can cut that off, we might be able to cut off the weapons propping up in the assad regime. we can't get those flights to land, be inspected. if jordan has intelligence there's weapons on those flights we can't cut it off. it is a damned shame because we spent all that time, blood in iraq, we should have that type of relationship where we can stop that. instead we can't. >>brian: secretary of state condoleezza told us here that status agreement was written to be renegotiation before it was up. if that was renegotiated successfully we would have had presence in the region and you could argue there would not be the intertribal strife they're witnessing right now. therefore, we would h
the facts straight, but it points in the direction of some chemical weapons used. was it the assad regime or the opposition? >> and this is a huge difference if it's chemical weapons. so where do we go from there? president obama that's the red line that can'ti be passed. red lines come and go with this administration and i think that's part of the problem. i think we have to come back to what the basic american interest is here and that makes sure that no chemical weapons get outside of syria into the hands of terrorists. what that may mean if they're now in fact in use, we are going to have to take some steps to destroy weapons in stock piles in arsenals in syria. what we need to protect against is that we don't end up destroying whatever is left of assad's command and control structure in a way that actually sti actual actually facilitates the opposition. and i think the risk of the weapons exiting syria is high enough that we will have to look at using force right now. not against-- not on one side or the other in the hostilities, but to destroy the chemical weapons. >> greta: ambassa
massacre of the same people by president assad. fortunately, the syrian nuclear capacity was destroyed. but unfortunately, thousands of chemical weapons remain. we cann we cannot allow those weapons to fall in the terrorists' hands. it could lead to an epic tragedy. in an attempt to spring to the arab world, it is an arab choice, it is an arab initiative. it may bring peace to the region, freedom to the people, economic growth to the arab states. eventually, it can lead to a better tomorrow. we pray it will become a reality. i believe the real division is between skeptics and those who believe in peace. your voice will encourage, i believe. you came to us with the clear message that no one should let skepticism win the day. a vision that says clearly that peace is not only a wish, but a possibility. i fully support your call. there is no other way to make the fooch better. there is no better leader to make it possible. your visit is an historic step in that direction. we shall journey with you all the way. thank you. >> thank you so much. well, thank you, president peres, for your very
deny allowing the transfer of weapons through iraqi air space to president al assad's regime. >>> if you haven't heard the news yet, the winning powerball ticket for $338 million was sold in new jersey. sadly not here in atlanta. the winning numbers are 17, 29, 31, 52, 53. p powerball number is 31. the largest powerball jackpot in history was back in november. it was worth close to $588 million. >>> it is officially spring. may favorite season. birds, flowers, and great outdoors finally shakes off its winter coat. let me show you some glorious pring d spring days around the country just today. isn't that beautiful? kansas city, missouri. didn't get the memo that spring officially arrived four days ago. three to nine inches of snow. knocked out power to 5,000 homes today. atlanta, powerful thunderstorms. all night long. pushed over huge trees on to houses and cars. fell much colder than normal. water is rising all over the atlanta area. flood warnings in some places. and this is colorado. all around denver today. single digit temperatures and snow that shut down parts of both
constructive steps as it relates to what happens after assad leaves and we're certainly hoping for that day to be upon us. >> senator, bob casey, thank you so much. it's good to see you. >> thanks, chris. >>> we were watching -- it was a ceremonial tree planting ceremony. but in the meantime, ambassador, let me ask you a little bit more about syria. and we heard both president obama and netanyahu reference the changing region. let me ask you about your -- your thoughts on arming the rebels. should we or what might happen to get us to that point. what do you imagine these conversations over syria are going to be like? >> this creeping incrementalism that we have engaged in over syria is for all intents and purposes is not going to really change the equation on the ground. we have so marginalized ourselves with respect to the events on the ground in syria. the rule and reason that the united states could comply is more or less dissipated. most are furious at the united states for not doing enough, depending on which side you talk to and which group you can wind up talking to. and so this deba
and white house press secretary jay carney issued a warning to the assad regime. >> we have no evidence to substantiate the charge that the opposition has used chemical weapons. we are deeply skeptical of a regime has lost all credibility and warn the regime against making these kind of charges as any kind of pretext or cover for its use of chemical weapons. >> neither side of the conflict has provided documentation that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i
that could take out president assad's aircraft power and talk about more robust aid to the opposition. significant, of course, carl levi? a democrat. >> bret: ed henry traveling with the president in jerusalem. thank you. explosion at a mosque in damascus left 42 people dead. syrian t is calling at it terrorist suicide blast. among the dead, senior pro-government muslim cleric. let's get some insight now on the syria situation and other foreign policy challenges. joining me tonight is the chairman of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers. mr. chairman, thank you for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> bret: let's start in syria. what do we know about the possibility of chemical weapons being used there? >> if you take the whole body of work, from the intelligence reports over the last two years, i believe it's highly probable that chemical weapons were used at least in some small amounts in syria. which is in violation of the chemical weapons convention. >> bret: now, foreign policy magazine, they have this quote. syrian support group, s.s.g., the only ameri
to assist the assad regime. john kerry said had he a very spirited discussion with iraqi prime minister nuri al maliki was was asked for further information. not exactly the concession he wanted there. also during this visit news broke of the resignation of opposition leader, something which mr. kerry described as many inevitable, saying they'd already begun working with his son and say this is all part what have he referred to as a continuum in leadership. the opposition was bigger than one man. but clearly putting a brave face on a man who the u.s. has put quite a lot of investment into and an opposition which seems to be crumb pling around them just as the u.s. begins to pick up its fefrefforts to provide furt aid. nick pay tton walsh, cnn, baghd. >>> a couple sat on the roof of this house in their cadillac. >>> and new york's mayor is spending millions of his own money to try to end gun violence. his tv ad blitz begins this week. is kevin. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he g
in an apparent assassination attempt. that's according to opposition forces. they say colonel rial assad was injured when his car was targeted in an explosion. >> they would not confirm reports that his foot actually had to be amputated. he's head of the free syrian army. he is not related to the syrian president. what the video shows is what is said to be the aftermath of that blast. >> also in syria opposition leader tried to resign yesterday but the national coalition's executive committee said no. so he agreed to stay on until the group's next meeting. >> he says powerful countries are using the syrian crisis to advance their own interests. he plans to talk about it at the arab league summit going to happen later this week. >>> and now to a man who has defied threats on his life to return home. >> we're talking about pakistan's former president. he arrived in the port city of karachi on sunday. pervez musharraf spending almost five years in self-imposed exile. >> mainly in london and also dubai. he actually faces criminal charges at home. and get this, the taliban, well, they're thre
. at the same time, both president obama and king abdullah have called for president assad to accept down and have made it clear that they don't see much of a future for him in running that country. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> today's tweet of the day has to do with march madness. in case you didn't hear, 14th seed harvard earned its first ever ncaa victory last night. so today this is what the harvard lampoon tweeted -- america, we are sorry for messing up your brackets and your financial system and everything else. seed harvard earned its first >>> hard to believe it's been ten years since the shock and au campaign that laufrgesed the iraq war. i was on the air as it was all unfolding. this clip is from the morning after the war began. >> let's get you up to date on what is happening. it started at 9:30 eastern time last night when president bush gave the order and attacks were made against leadership targets, saddam hussein in a bunker around baghdad. and since then, a lot of activity for those troops massed along the iraq kuwaiti border. they have gotten some scares
weapons attack. syrian rebels in the assad regime are accusing much using weapons of mass destruction. the u.s. is investigating whether one of the worst fears about syria's civil war has now become a reality. here's cnn's nick payton walsh. >> re have reports from activists of two separate incidents, one near alepo, where it appears a gas was released and mostly hit a regime-loyal area and regime troops. people suffocating in the streets and fatalities. and another near damascus where we have images of people in hospital. not clear what the gas is. the regime said the rebels use it. it really doesn't pass the logic test. it's much more likely it comes from the regime's stockpiles. it's vitally important on the international stage, the russians have stood forward and said according to their information, they believe the rebels used this chemical weapon. the u.s. is investigating. doesn't have any immediate signs that was the case. reiterates the obama administration red line that if such chemical weapons are used, there will be consequences. wolf, brianna? >> nick on the scene for us.
into the possible use of chemical weapons in syria. president bashar al assad and his government accusing opposition of using them in aleppo. the opposition pointing its collective finger at the syrian government. as both sides continue to squabble, u.s. officials are trying to get proof that chemical weapons were used at all. pentagon correspondent barbara starr is following all these developments for us. she is joining us live. where are we right now on this, barbara? >> good morning, zoraida. u.s. intelligence community is conducting its own investigation as to what happened there and we have new details. as more pictures emerged of hospitalized syrians, cnn has learned u.s. intelligence agencies are in a massive around-the-clock effort to determine if these people were attacked by chemical weapons. so far, u.s. officials say there is no corroboration. >> so far, we have no evidence to substantiate the reports that chemical weapons were used. >> reporter: in a classified briefing to congress, intelligence officials said it's not clear what happened. but cnn has learned new details about how the c
assad can hang on? an update on syria the most important item here. >> what was really accomplished, john, in this trip overall? >> reporter: you know, you have to say, don, i think what was accomplished is important foundations were set down. we'll see in the weeks and months ahead whether they produced the results the president wants. let's go through one of them, very important, not on the schedule. that was the president brokering a call this morning, between the israeli prime minister and the turkish prime minister. two traditional allies who have not had normal relations for about three years now. remember, that gaza blockade, israeli commandos killed some turks on a boat out, trying to bring humanitarian aid to gaza, relations broke off. the president brokered a call this morning in which prime minister netanyahu apologized to prime minister erdogan, promised to bring restitution to the families back in the united states. to have them back, back on the same page, is very, very important. also comparing notes with the israeli leadership about the diplomacy with iran over its n
iraq of helping syrian president bashar al assad arm fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> and new this morning, former penn state assistant football coach jerry sandusky breaking his silence from behind bars. a documentary filmmaker saying he has recorded telephone conversations with sand us ki that will air today on nbc. the family of the late joe paterno, the head football coach whose career ended in disgrace are already speaking out. they called the recording quote a sad and unfortunate development saying it's transparently self-serving, and yet another insult to the victims and anyone who cares about the truth in this tragic story. >>> a public memorial service for colorado's prison chief will be held today in colorado springs. tom clement was laid to rest yesterday in a private funeral. he was shot and killed tuesday in his driveway. the parolee authorities believe did it was killed thursday in a shutout in texas. he's also believed to have killed a pizza deliveryman. >>> and the supreme court takes up the issue of same-sex marriage starting tomorrow dozens of pe
. >> it's not about one person. it's about president assad, it's about a regime that is killing its own people. it's about an opposition that is bigger than one person, and that opposition will continue. >> and the split between the opposition civilian leaders and its fighters is growing. the rebels rejecting a new provisional prime minister. one expert on syria says the country now is headed for a complete meltdown if the obama administration doesn't stop hedging its bets. >> we waited, it didn't get any better. president assad is not stepping aside, and the opposition is becoming more extremist, because they are the ones receiving the political support and the arms. >> ironically, this lack of unity among the opposition is only reenforcing the administration's belief that it should be cautious in what kind of help and assistance it provides the opposition. kate? >> jill dougherty, thanks so much, jill. >>> you heard in jill's piece, mike rogers. the michigan republican is joining me live from lansing, michigan, for more on this. mr. chairman, thanks so much for taking the time. >> tha
sit down and figure out what happens to syria after their president assad is gone. convincing iraq to stop that, the iraqi election to prime minister al-maliki recently and suddenly delayed for six months and secretary of state is to convince him and reverse course and not waiting for a vote. and a meeting got underway in the last half hour or so, at some points we expect to see kerry at a solo press conference in iraq and we hope to get an update then about how things have been going on this surprise trip. back to you in new york. >> alisyn: peter, thank you very much for the update. let's get to the rest of your headlines. another fox news for you right now. let's take a live look from vatican city. this is pope francis celebrating palm sunday mass in a packed st. peter's square and next to easter the most holy day in the catholic church. this is a day after pope francis met with pope emeritus benedict xvi, and the two spoke privately for about 45 minutes and then the two prayed side by side. a tragic skydiving accident in florida that left two people dead. an experienced instruc
to steer syria toward a post assad transition. >> back to israelis and their concerns about president obama, does the president need to simply establish the roots, the ancient jewish claim to this strip of land here? some in israel saying we're not so sure. >> well, certainly. i think that the president has not reached out to the israeli people in ways perhaps his predecessors have. and i think this is an opportunity to kind of reestablish the kind of rapport the israeli people traditionally want to have and need to have with an american president that they have confidence that he has israel's back. the fact is that there has been very significant and deep cooperation institutionally between the united states and israel. probably a more stable, successful relationship than ever before. but there is this lack of rapport between obama and the israeli people. and he'll do his best to reach out. one of the reasons he is speaking to college students and not at the knesset is to go beyond the government and try to establish a much more significant conversation with the israeli people. >> i wish w
. take a look at jordan to try to buck up the rebels so they can defeat assad. these are real steps. >> sean: colonel i see a weak president being run over because the he does nothing. i can't imagine them flying arms over our space with nuclear weapons and nothing happening. >> we're seeing consequences of bidding from hinld. let's deal with what we saw this morning. i've seen reports and unclassified version of it. we've seen the footage that came out of today. it does not appear to me as a person who understands a little bit about chemical weapons about 10 years ago today wearing a chemical suit you may remember and broadcasting on your show. thon footage you're watching now there is no evidence of anyone suffering from exposure, whether it's propaganda on part of the rebels or government it appears to me there is a person who understands what consequences would be, there is nobody that can suffer with chemical weapons. >> sean: what about the reporter of the chlorine smell? 31 dead? >> i don't want to take any thing from our colleagues but when a large munition like a war scud g
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